Category: Museums

Museums

Museum of the Great Plains

Learn about the famed Leoti/Coronado County Seat Fight of 1887.

We have a large collection of violins, Marion Bonner fossils, and pioneer and old west artifacts.

Recently the museum received a new railroad collection of Richard L. George. Richard began his railroad career as a fireman in the early 1940?s and went on to become an engineer of steam locomotives. One of Richard?s favorite engines, which he drove, was Santa Fe?s streamlined steam engine, the “Blue Goose”.

Items includes the engineer “weigh box”, which the engineer must take on each run. It is filled with many of Mr. George’s instruction manuals, train orders, souvenirs of railroad fairs, and photographs of trains. Among the collection was a train track jack, a railroad pick, many assorted railroad lanterns, and a large framed lithograph of the beautiful Santa Fe “Blue Goose”, and one of the Union Station in Kansas City.

Richard enjoyed the art of photography and took many slides and movies of trains and railroad. There are photographs of trains, wrecks, blizzards and many of the Kansas Flood of 1951. Richard made several scrapbooks of the newspaper articles of the stories of the flood, among these pages are his train orders at the time of the flood. He has written a detailed story in diary form of his involvement at this time of such terrible destruction. All of these photos, scrapbooks, slides, and footage of movies have been donated to the museum. This in itself is a fantastic “first account” piece of history.

Stevens County Gas & Historical Museum

The Stevens County Gas & Historical Museum was dedicated on May 16, 1961. It was established as a memento of the Hugoton Gas Field and the progressive development of Stevens County.

Currently, the gas well, drilled in 1945,is still producing. The 1945 well equipment is on display at the location of the well.

The main museum building houses displays of early 1900 furnishings including a chapel, dining room, parlor, kitchen, and a sewing room. Also, in the main buildings displays of Indian artifacts, farming tools, a printing and western shop, and art room bring back life to the days of long ago.

Completely restored buildings on the half-block museum complex include the Santa Fe Hugoton Train Depot, an 1887 school house, an 1887 home (one of the oldest homes in Hugoton), and an early day grocery store and barber shop. There’s a Professional Building (a tribute to Hugoton’s past judges and lawyers), the first jail house in Hugoton, and a 1905 church (the second church built in Hugoton). The Agricultural Building, completed in 1995, offers extensive displays of farm equipment & implements. rn rn

Stanton County Museum

The Stanton County Museum gives a glimpse of the past and fascinating look at the history of Stanton County. There are nine buildings on the museum site and each has a special story to tell about the residents and the proud pioneer history of this county.

1. The main building of the museum complex is built of native stone. Originally constructed as a shop for the road department, the building was built in 1935 as a WPA project.

2. The Santa Fe Depot was constructed in 1923. It was sold at auction 60 years later and purchased \"Santaby Alfred Ramsay and donated to the museum. The depot houses railroad memorabilia including a small collection of 1930\’s Santa Fe calendars.

3. The decommissioned Santa Fe caboose has been repainted inside and is set up similar to what it would have been like for the train crew who used it as working and living quarters.

4. The Vosburg ironclad elevator was constructed in 1928. As the largest elevator in Johnson, it had a capacity of 15,000 bushels of grain. Most grain trucks of that era held only 60 bushels. The elevator was moved from its location on the railroad tracks to the museum site in 1994.

5. The scale house that accompanies the elevator features weighing equipment and other artifacts necessary for operation. A second room in the scale house is a bunkhouse room with cowboys and farmhand artifacts.

6. The reconstructed jail houses the county\’s original double jail cell with attached corridor, and tells the story of the progress of law enforcement in Stanton County.

7. The Ray Scott building was moved from its location just off Main Street. It has the original pressed tin ceiling and wall. It houses the museum\’s collection of transportation and tractors, along with automotive tools and accessories.

8. The 1923 house was built by Elam and Helena Hilty. The original four rooms housed the family, and a schoolteacher often boarded with them as the house was located across the street from the Old Rock School. Altho, the house was modernized in 1948 with indoor plumbing, the original four rooms are set up in a manner that is consistent with the 1920\’s.

9. The old general store building has been home to a variety of businesses and still contains original counters of Tucker\’s general store.

Coronado Museum

The Coronado Museum is housed in a landmark structure originally built in 1918 as the residence of the Lee Larrabee family. The building retains the warmth and style of an early Western home. Oak staircases, paneled walls and floors add an unusual charm to the treasures of the people who settled Seward County, Kansas.

In keeping with its affiliation with the Seward County Historical Society, the museum features both items that helped to settle the territory during its Wild West heyday, including an extensive weapons display and a large collection of those things that gave it a more civilized tone, including a beautifully restored ornate antique organ, quilts and home furnishings.

A Western Gallery, with photos of ranch life and frontier settlers, tells the story of the taming of the land. In 1996, the museum opened a western living exhibit, featuring artifacts and a recreation of what Seward County might have been like in its early days.

Mid-America Air Museum

With more than 90 aircraft on display, the Mid-America Air Museum in Liberal, Kansas, is one of the largest aviation museums in the United States. Whether you are interested in general aviation, classic planes, home builts, warbirds, or modern jets, there\’s something to spark your imagination at the museum. Highlights of the collection include the Cessna Airmaster owned by Dwane Wallace, long-time president of Cessna Aircraft and a Beech Model 17 Staggerwing. Military airplanes include a World War II B-25 Mitchell bomber, a Korean War veteran F-80 Shooting Star, and an F-14A Tomcat used during Desert Storm.

Hands-on exhibits demonstrate how and why airplanes fly. Launch a hot air balloon. Unlock the mysteries of lift using a wind tunnel. Study the inner workings of aircraft engines. Operate the control surfaces of an airplane to see how pilots guide their flying machines through the air. All this and much more awaits you at the Mid-America Air Museum.

Land of OZ Dorothy’s House

Liberal’s Dorothy’s House was built in 1907 and donated to the Seward County Historical Society. It has been carefully restored and furnished with period furnishings to reproduce the warmth of the farmhouse where Dorothy realized that:

“There’s no place like home.”

In the “Land of Oz” families can wander down the Yellow Brick Road through 5000 square feet of animated entertainment – good and bad witches, the Munchkins, talking trees, winged monkeys, and of course, Dorothy, the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion are all there to enthrall children of all ages.

And adults will enjoy the Oz memorabilia on display, including the original model of Dorothy’s house used in the 1939 filming of the Wizard of Oz.

El Quartelejo Museum

You’ll discover the fascinating history of Scott County and its surrounding area at the El Quartelejo Museum located on the west edge of Scott City. What did prehistoric fish look like and why are their fossil bones found in Scott County? How is it that people find sharks teeth in the canyons of northern Scott County? Did mammoths and camels once roam the grasslands of this area? What is the evidence that shows people lived and hunted along Beaver Creek 10,000 years ago?

Answers to these questions and even more will be provided at the El Quartelejo Museum. Using a timeline beginning at the Creatceous period and ending with the present day, the Museum will exhibit fossils, photos, maps, antiques and articles of information to tell the surprising story of Scott County.

Additional displays include a Pueblo Indian Display, an Early Indian Camp Scene, a Pioneer Homestead, and information about the Farm and Cattle Industry.

Keystone Gallery

The Keystone Gallery is housed in the historic limestone building built in 1917 as a community church. It houses a prehistoric museum with late Cretaceous fossils from the Kansas Niobrara formation, a curio shop, featured artwork by Charles Bonner, and information about Monument Rocks.

Visitors can see everything from sharks teeth and fossil fish to flying and swimming reptiles.

The Central States Scout Museum

Welcome to the most extensive exhibit and collection of scouting memorabilia you will probably ever set foot in. Old scouting enthusiasts will find this museum is the premier scout museum in the United States. Complete with several letters, photos and original drawings from scoutings\’ founders (Baden Powell, ET Seton, James West, and Dan Beard), this museum is truly an experience. The museum has a broad range of uniforms including Sea Scout and Air Scout with our oldest uniforms dating from the 1920s. Old Merit Badge Sashes by Scout, Explorer and Air Explorer, including Merit Badges, medals and patches are displayed with over 100 old turn-down Merit Badges. Also included in the collection is a prerevolutionary Russian Scout Badge, Rockwell\’s Spirit of Scouting coins and many Rockwell plates, cups and figurines.

The museum fully occupies a former auto dealership and is FULL of Scouting memorabilia, attractively displayed in showcases. The core of the collection is the rnpersonal property of a former Scouter named Charles Sherman who is the chief curator of the museum. It houses a wealth of other items donated or loaned by other former Scouts in this area — and we are numerous! If you have any Scouting memorabilia in the closet that should be seen by today\’s Scouts, you should consider donating it or, at least, loaning it to the CSSM.