Category: Museums

Museums

Carnival Heritage Center & Museum

Out of the heartland of America, a farmer decided those wooden horses made more money than farming. In 1908, Charles Brodbeck was fascinated that people would ride a horse to town and pay a nickel to ride a wooden horse. He bought a carousel and the family built one of the largest family carnivals in the nation. This museum is preserving that unique history of carnival in Kinsley.

The Center preserves the traditions of the family carnival, salutes famous carnival individuals and provides a nostalgic look at a form of entertainment from a simpler time.

See the Carousel Carving by Bruce White, a master carver recognized nationally for his carousel horses. Bruce will show you how these colorful works of art were made at the turn of the century. Ride his carousel in the Carnival Museum and visit White’s Carousel factory in downtown Kinsley.

Edwards County Historical Society Museum

Welcome to Edwards County Historical Society sod house, museum, and chapel, which is located half-way between New York City and San Francisco, in the Half-way Park at the West Edge of Kinsley, Kansas.

Our Pioneer forefathers had the to endure many hardships and helped to make this County what it is today. We regret that they are not here to tell of their experiences and show what they had to work with.

It was with this thought in mind that the Edwards County Historical Society was organized.

Old Soddy is a Community Project under the direction of the Chamber of Commerce and The Edwards County Historical Society.

All the furniture in the house was donated by people in the community, and at one time most of it was in use in homes of the early Pioneers.

Sod House InteriorAfter Old Soddy was completed, the need for more display space became apparent as more historic items were being brought in for display.

To provide this space the Museum was built with money given as Memorials and Donations in honor of the pioneer families. Donations and Memorials are still being received to improve the Museum. Any Contributions or Donations will be greatly appreciated to help make this a bigger and better Museum for Edwards County Historical Society by Mr. and Mrs. L.E. Brown of Lewis, Kansas. It was moved to the Half-way Park in Kinsley to serve as a Historical Chapel in connection with the Sod House and Museum.

The location is convenient for tourists as Highways 50 and 56 pass the site and No. 183 is but a few blocks to the east.

More and more people are making stops at Halfway Park, with visitors from every state and many foreign countries.

We are pleased you could stop and visit our Museum. We hope you may again return, and hope you tell your friends that there is a fine Museum in Kinsley and that they will find a genuine WELCOME among friends.

Comanche County Historical Museum

A Stan Herd mural painted in 1986 introduces visitors to the Comanche County Historical Museum. The museum showcases people, events, memorabilia and artifacts from earlier times.

One of the most interesting exhibits at this Coldwater museum is the Comanche Cattle Pool, the largest cattle pool in Kansas. A group of cattlemen combined their herds to form the largest cattle ranch ever established in Kansas. By 1884 the Comanche Cattle Pool contained 84,000 cattle and covered about 4,000 square miles. It dissolved in 1885 due to a terrible blizzard and to the advent of new fencing laws. rn

Tim’s Diner

Tim’s Diner is a simple stop at the intersection where food and refreshment reveals a surprising discovery – behind the log cabin exterior rests numerous wildlife mounts and dioramas, featuring moose, squirrel, beaver, rattlesnakes, prairie dogs, and much more — representing not only southwest Kansas, but also, the world. The owner has tucked into the cafe and club the hunting treasures of a lifetime – all displayed in dioramas to bring pleasure to his dining guests.

The Pioneer-Krier Museum

The Pioneer-Krier Museum compiles the history of the pioneers of Clark County, Kansas. Furnishings range from a country store with its cracker barrel and array of merchandise, to collections of fossils, stones, and barb wire. A rare display of pre-historic animal bones excavated near Ashland is said to compare favorably to ones found in the Smithsonian Institution. Furnishings used in schools, banks, churches, hospitals, funeral parlors, real estate shops, harness shops, barber shops, and different rooms of homes are displayed.

The building houses the Harold Krier Aerobatic Museum, containing the planes of the late Harold Krier, Ashland native and a former National Aerobatic Champion, as well as the trophies and memorabilia from Krier’s famous career, not only in America, but in the Europe and the Iron Curtain countries.

Botanica-The Wichita Gardens

Come and discover a place to revive your senses. At the end of Museum Boulevard, insulated from city bustle, you’ll experience an unfamiliar calm. It is a complete sensory experience. What jars the senses fully awake is the array of color. Nearly 10 acres, an immodest crazy quilt of color. Great splotches of color that change from one week to the next.

The color marathon begins with spring’s sunburst – a sassy profusion of maverick stars, even before you arrive at the gate. More than 100,000 spring bulbs bloom in the Gardens. Tulips of every color and type show their stuff, and daffodils cover the slopes in the mini-wilderness that marks Botanica’s southern boundary.

Each season delivers a new green, growing, blooming beauty. Exotic water garden plants; Native flowering “weeks” in the wildflower garden; Winged blossoms flying freely in their own special Butterfly Garden or safely captive in their own Butterfly House; A whole season of rosy fragrance; A unique garden that visitors with limited sight or mobility can fully experience by touch and smell; And as the evenings begin to chill, 6,000 mums defy fall’s first frost, the final chorus to a great annual extravaganza. The season ends with a holiday display as thousands of luminaries and holiday lights make the paths and structures of Botanica glow.

Wichita Art Museum

The Wichita Art Museum (WAM), showcasing American art, is the largest art museum in the state of Kansas. Nationally renowned for its outstanding collection of American art, the WAM is home to three centuries of American masterpieces and more than 7,000 works of art. The Roland P. Murdock Collection includes must-see masterpieces by Mary Cassatt, Arthur Dove, Grace Hartigan, Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer and Thomas Eatkins. Both children and adults can enjoy a hands-on art experience in the interactive gallery. WAM is also a frequent stop for major traveling exhibitions from the country’s leading museums.

Kansas Firefighters Museum

Historic Engine House No. 6 – The year is 1910. Imagine a pair of matched fire horses, Tom and Dick, in their stalls, one on each side of the apparatus floor, awaiting their next run. The Armstrong harnesses are hanging from the ceiling in readiness. (The pulleys are still there.) The four firemen on duty may be gathered around the potbellied stove at the rear of the floor or perhaps have retired to the bunk room on the second floor. Their names are W. R. Snow, Willie Spenser, Fred Davis and Charles Duffner. The red Seagraves combination chemical and hose wagon sets facing the accordian door that opens out to Old Lawrence Avenue.

But that scene is short-lived. Engine House No. 6 was the last horsedrawn station in Wichita. By 1918 the horses were gone, and Wichita had become the first all-mechanized fire department in the United States and the second in the world.

By 1953, the old classic neighborhood station was obselete and closed. It was used for storage and reserve firefighter training, but it fell into disrepair and was destined for demolition.

In 1993, concerned firefighters and neighborhood residents cooperated to restore the building and develop the first Kansas firefighters museum. This grassroots endeavor was accomplished mainly by a half dozen loyal volunteers who faithfully worked one day a week on the project for several years.

The structure was placed on the National and Kansas Registers of Historic Places in 1994.

See the American LaFrance Metropolitan steam powered pumper, 1923 Ford Model-T firetruck, 1909 horsedrawn chemical and hose wagon, 1880s Howe handpumper, 19th Century handdrawn chemical extinguisher, 19th Century handdrawn hose reel, fire helmets, uniforms, badges, caps, wooden water mains, hydrants, nozzels, alarms, leather buckets, extinguishers, ladders, toys, fire related photographs, fire manuals, books, and much more!

The Kansas Fallen Firefighters Memorial is dedicated to those Kansas firefighters known to have died in the line of duty. It is located just south of the Kansas Firefighters Museum, 1300 S. Broadway, Wichita, Kansas.

The museum and memorial are situated on the northwest corner of Lincoln Park and across the street from a modern fire station.

The memorial courtyard includes:rn• A statue of a firefighter discovering the helmet of a comrade amid debrisrn• A brick plaza of engraved bricksrn• A memorial wall and meditation arearn• A 50 foot tall flagpole from Engine House No. 9

Lowell D. Holmes Museum of Anthrpology

The Lowell D. Holmes Museum of Anthropology at Wichita State University seeks to broaden and enhance knowledge of the world’s diverse cultures, their histories, and their people.

Museum collections focus on Pacific Rim cultures, including Japan, Korea, China, and Southeast Asia; the American Southwest; Mesoamerica; and Andean South America. Other cultures, prehistoric and physical anthropology, and topical displays occupy the corridor cases including clothing, pottery, tools, and archaeological artifacts.

Kansas Aviation Museum

The Kansas Aviation Museum is housed in the aerodrome historical district of the original Wichita Municipal Airport, in the “Air Capital of the World,” at Wichita, Kansas. This historical commercial aerodrome was used for public transportation to and from Wichita from the time of the architectural design in 1929 until it was sold to the US Air Force in 1954.

Ours is one of very few remaining Art Deco Airport Terminals in the United States, and holds special significance having been designated on Charles Lindbergh’s initial air mail route. In fact, our city built the terminal to help win the bid as an air-mail stop. And AIR MAIL is credited as the Father of modern commercial aviation. On the National Register of Historic Places, this is a NATIONAL TREASURE, and a basis for an evolving world class museum.

YES! You too can walk the stairs that Charles Lindbergh walked! …and view the massive 37 foot bas-relief sculpture honoring Lindy’s solo trans-Alantic flight.

The entire museum aircraft population includes artifacts manufactured in Kansas, from vintage and more current homebuilt aircraft, to original Stearman, Boeing, Beechcraft, Learjet, Cessna, even the Swallow of Lindbergh airmail fame, and less well-known aircraft springing from the passions of Kansas’ sons and daughters, and those who chose to come to Kansas for the support that Kansas offered for the aviation phenomenon.

The historic aerodrome grounds includes ramp storage for a growing number of military and civilian aircraft built in Kansas, the largest of which is a Boeing-built B-52, and the smallest, Cessna-built jet Air Force trainer, T-37B “Tweety Bird” –The Air Force’s first jet trainer, and Cessna’s first jet manufactured; notable as Cessna’s Citation series are the most popular “bizjet” in the world today.