Category: Museums

Museums

The Mid-America All Indian Center

The Mid-America All-Indian Center preserves the heritage of the American Indian tribes of North America and is located at the confluence of the Big and Little Arkansas Rivers, on land where the Wichita tribe camped more than 100 years ago.

The only center of its kind in Kansas, the museum showcases changing exhibitions of traditional arts and crafts, plus contemporary artwork. Visit the Gallery of Nations Hall, a display of tribal flags, and learn about different Native American Nations. Explore the Indian Artists’ Walk of Fame, a series of gardens dedicated to renowned Native American artists.

Walk the paths of the Plains Indian Encampment, listen to the sounds of the big and little Arkansas Rivers flowing to either side and the prairie wind rustling through the trees overhead. Catch a glimpse of what village life was like for the people who first lived in this area … the Plains Indians.

The Plains Indian Encampment is 9,200 sq. ft in size. It includes a Wichita Grass Lodge, Wichita Grass Arbor, Cheyenne tipi, drying rack and an American Indian garden and prairie. Encampment open May through November.

Just follow the skyline and look for The Keeper of the Plains, the majestic 44-foot-high sculpture created by Wichita artist, Blackbear Bosin. The museum gift shop features authentic Indian arts and crafts.

The Kansas African American Museum

The heritage of a great people awaits you at the Kansas African American Museum. View thousands of artifacts that reflect the diverse contributions and history of the African culture, including traditional and contemporary African and African American art.

See the best work of local aspiring African American artists in visual, literary and performing arts mediums. A premiere museum in the Midwest, the museum’s archival department enables youth and adults to research African Americans and local history.

Housed in one of the oldest African American churches in the state, the historic neoclassical Calvary Baptist Church was built by African Americans in 1917 and is now listed on the National Register of Historical Places. The museum is committed “to preserving the history of a great people” through exhibits, cultural programing, youth acytivities/camps, and educational lectures.rn

Great Plains Transportation Museum

The Great Plains Transportation Museum, GPTM, displays a wide assortment of railroad equipment, artifacts and memorabilia.

The two largest displays are the Santa Fe steam locomotive #3768 and the Santa Fe FP45 diesel #93. These locomotives are unique in the collection in that they represent the last class of passenger locomotives built for the Santa Fe in their respective eras.

Indoor exhibits include railroad prints, signs, lanterns, tools, and other artifacts including a mock-up mechanical stoker used for training steam locomotive personnel.

Gift shop merchandise includes clothes, hats, books, artifacts, videos, toys, and other railroad paraphernalia.

Parking is available just east of the Douglas street entrance. Enter through the gift shop and head up stairs and see a collection of rolling stock or watch modern trains rolling by. You can also stand at the front door and see the grand old Union Station across the street.rn

Museum of World Treasures

Experience a trip through time at one of the most interesting and exciting museums in America. You’ll be amazed and intrigued as you discover our incredible collection of ten real dinosaurs including Woolly Mammoth fossils, six Egyptian Royal Mummies, Crown Jewels and swords of Royalty, an unequaled American Presidents exhibit, a 12 foot 4.5 ton section of the Berlin Wall, an extensive Militaria collection from the Revolutionary War, American Civil War, WW I, WW II, Korea and Vietnam, a Wild West exhibit, Music and Hollywood Stars exhibits, and a superb Sports Hall of Fame. Children will also enjoy the fun activity center including a Moon Walk, Puppet Theater, and large play castle and dungeon.

Ulrich Museum of Art

The Ulrich Museum of Art, an integral part of Wichita State University, was established in 1974 to enhance and support the university’s educational and service mission. Since its founding, the museum has served as Wichita?s premier venue for contemporary works by established and emerging artists of national and international significance. A lively schedule of provocative and challenging exhibitions is complemented by an important collection of 20th-century painting, sculpture, and works on paper by such key historical figures as Milton Avery, Alexander Calder, Robert Henri, Willem de Kooning, Jacob Lawrence, Sol LeWitt, Joan Miró, Robert Motherwell, Elie Nadelman, Robert Rauschenberg, and Andy Warhol, and more contemporary, 21st-century artists including Radcliffe Bailey, Jennifer Bartlett, Enrique Chagoya, Salomon Huerta, Neal Jenney, David Levinthal, Nic Nicosia, Alan Rath, David Salle, Peter Sarkisian, Shahzia Sikander, Jessica Stockholder, David Reed and Kara Walker.

The museum is also well known for the Martin H. Bush Outdoor Sculpture Collection, a group of more than sixty 20th-century monumental works installed across WSU?s 330-acre campus that includes important pieces by Scott Burton, Luis Jiménez, Henry Moore, Louise Nevelson, Claes Oldenburg, George Rickey and Auguste Rodin.

Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum

A distinctive local landmark, Wichita’s 1892 City Hall building is home to the Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum. Known as the “Palace of the Plains,” the building is one of the city’s architectural jewels. Its beautifully appointed interior, featuring fine woodwork, decorative painting, and leaded glass, provides a perfect setting for your visit back in time.

The Museum’s four floors of exhibits include:

  • Wichita: The Magic City, the fascinating story of Wichita’s early years, from the buffalo-hunting days of the 1860s to the dawn of the air age in 1911.
  • A Wichita Cottage, a recreated Victorian Home
  • The Jones Six, a rare automobile built in Wichita in 1917
  • An orginal marble soda fountain from a 1910 Kansas pharmacy

Get a glimpse into the life of a century ago through a marvelous collection of period furniture, decorative arts, dolls and toys, fashions and other artifacts. rn

Old Cowtown Museum Complex

Relive the 1870s at Old Cowtown Museum, a 25-acre, outdoor living history center on the banks of the Big Arkansas River off the Chisholm Trail. Walk the wooden boardwalks to a recreated Old West cattle town. Of the 60 structures on grounds, 27 are considered original, historic buildings. The buildings provide an authentic backdrop for costumed staff to bring history to life for visitors. The Munger House is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Highlights of the 36 exhibits on the Museum’s grounds include historic home tours, working blacksmith, carpentry and newspapers shops, 1880s farm, marshal’s office, law office, church, one-room schoolhouse, general store, clothing store, saloon and cowboy camp. See Wichita’s first jail ( or the “hoosegow” as it was known then). Visit a working farm, circa 1880, complete with longhorn cattle. Authentically costumed history interpreters on the grounds chat with visitors and provide a hands-on, educational experience.

There are 13,003 artifacts in Old Cowtown Museum’s collections. The primary purpose of the collections is to furnish the exhibits in its historic buildings and to demonstrate life in Wichita, Sedgwick County and the Southern Plains during the period of 1865 to 1880. The Museum also has a growing collection of reproductions for the purpose of historical interpretation and demonstration. The historical collection encompasses historical documents and photographs, domestic items, textiles, agricultural items, trades items, scientific equipment and furniture. Our hands-on collection is similar to the historic collection yet most of the items are reproductions or from a later period.

Souders Historical Farm Museum

This is a private, historical museum located on the Souders farm one half mile west of Cheney. The Souders Historical Museum depicts what life was like in Cheney and rural Kansas in the late 1880s and early 1900s.

There are a number of buildings on the Farm, including a Main Street, several businesses, a school, a church, a homesteaders cabin, and train depots from both Cheney and neighboring Garden Plain. The buildings contain a variety of artifacts, historical photos and educational materials.

The pioneer chapel tells the story of early day churches with furnishings from the first churches. The little washhouse is equipped with the kitchen range and early day washing machines, and other household equipment. An original claim house, built as required for preempting a 160-acre farm under the Homestead Act, has been restored and equipped with appropriate furniture. The Dewey School was a one-room school located in Kingman County just a few miles west of Cheney, and was in operation from 1880 until 1944.