Category: Depots

Depots

Depot at Selkirk

The Shallow Water Depot will hopefully find its permanent setting at Selkirk, Kansas, after making its fifth move in over a hundred and thirteen years and restored as it would have looked in 1887.

The building had to be sold and removed from it?s present location at Pierceville caused by the new four-lane highway being built across Kansas. This is an excellent building and will add much character to the Selkirk site. We have been told this depot started at the Alfalfa station site, on the Garden City, Gulf & Northern Railway between Garden City and Scott City, Kansas, which was only 35 miles long. The first passenger train to Scott City ran on Dec. 30, 1909. The train only had to maintain a 20 m.p.h. schedule, so would stop and let people on or off anywhere along the line! The legal description of Alfalfa was Range 33 W, Twp. 23 S, Sec. 11 in Finney County. A very small shelter was built at Shallow Water, and the larger depot at Alfalfa. Before long Shallow Water was needing a real depot, and the two buildings were exchanged, very possible loaded on a railroad car and moved. The line was purchased by the Santa Fe Railway.

The large hip roof is made of slate tiles and is in excellent condition. The depot will be painted the original color of the Santa Fe Railway, which was brick red with green trim and the name of “Selkirk” will be painted on the ends. The area will be landscaped and a brick platform will be laid in the front of the building. A security system will also be installed. A plan in the distant future is a replica of the large water tank to be built. An application to the National Register of Historic Places has been made, having made our first application to the Kansas State Register and receiving their nomination to apply to the National Register.

The historic depot sets the atmosphere with perfection. While being an excellent display of the past railroad history in itself, the depot will be used as an area for the railroad model displays and other railroad artifacts, rest rooms and a gift shop. Landscaping and picnic tables are also in the future plans. Word from an official of the National Railway Co. is that they know of no other railroad well in existence.

– Wichita County Historical Society

Rock Island Depot

In April, 1888, the first train with goods other than construction materials arrived at the end of the new Rock Island line in Liberal, Kansas.

The depot, a crumbling relic just three years ago, was rescued and refurbished with a combination of funding from the city and state, private contributions, and a lot of hard work. With the first building completed, efforts continue to finish the eastern building, which once housed a hotel and restaurant.

For now, several city offices, including that of the director of community development and chamber of commerce, have found homes in the western building.

The newly restored depot is listed on the National Register for Historic Landmarks and is the central theme of the annual Rock Island Jubilee in June.

Santa Fe Depot

Lakin originated as one of the early stops on the Santa Fe Railroad from Dodge City to Colorado in 1872. This depot, constructed in 1876, replaced the original boxcar depot. The depot was moved to the museum site and restored in 1984.

Mr. James Thomas, grandson of the O’Loughlins, had worked for the railroad for many years. He helped to put the station in proper order and contributed countless pictures, documents and equipment to make the depot complete. rn

Missouri-Pacific Railroad Depot

In its boom, the railroad had eighteen scheduled trains running daily. With both passengers and freight, the trains were constantly on the move. Downs also had a large roundhouse with a capacity for ten locomotives, and with its well balanced turntable, could turn the heaviest locomotive with ease. Downs still has its railroad, operated by Kyle Railroad of Phillipsburg, which runs several freight trains weekly.

The Depot is currently being remodeled by the Downs Historical Society.

The Depot

The authentic red brick railroad depot was built in the early 1900’s and still displays the authentic red tile roof. The depot features a personalized brick pathway and etched glass family type transom window.

The depot is currently being renovated by the Willow Springs Art Council for use as a community art center. Facilities will be available for theater, music programs, art gallery, traveling exhibits, workshops, classes and other community events.

Santa Fe Depot

The Santa Fe Depot remains as an icon to the bygone days of railroading with memories of steam locomotives, doodlebugs and cabooses. Built in 1910, it is the only depot of this style left standing on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s former Southern Kansas Lines. The waiting area beneath the old brick archway and the numerous beveled glass windows make this depot an unforgettable landmark.

It stood in a state of disrepair after the Santa Fe had no further use of the facilities. Eventually the Chamber of Commerce set up headquarters there, and a model railroad club from Parsons constructed a complete Cherryvale area model railroad display in the baggage room of this depot. The Dick Webb family, owners of the South Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad, took possession of the depot in 1992, and with a rail excursion and preservation group, restored the depot to it’s original grandeur, keeping every element to it’s original status in 1910. With the purchase of three climate controlled passenger cars, Webb’s Heart of the Heartlands offers excursion train rides out of Cherryvale and other area towns during special celebrations.

The railroad boom in Cherryvale began in 1879 when the Frisco Railroad reached Cherryvale, crossing the already built Santa Fe. The Memphis Railroad Company extended it’s road from Parsons to Cherryvale, and the Santa Fe extended it’s road westward and built a branch line south to Coffeyville. The fall of 1880 saw the M.K. & T. Narrow Gauge road extended from Parsons to Cherryvale. By 1886, Cherryvale had railroads branching in many directions, and the railroad business was thriving.rnJust as it did in the 1800’s, the railroad continues to have a major influence in Cherryvale. The South, Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad currently uses the north-south railroad tracks through Cherryvale with several trains carrying freight and cargo through town.

Santa Fe Depot

The Santa Fe Depot remains as an icon to the bygone days of railroading with memories of steam locomotives, doodlebugs and cabooses. Built in 1910, it is the only depot of this style left standing on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s former Southern Kansas Lines. The waiting area beneath the old brick archway and the numerous beveled glass windows make this depot an unforgettable landmark.

It stood in a state of disrepair after the Santa Fe had no further use of the facilities. Eventually the Chamber of Commerce set up headquarters there, and a model railroad club from Parsons constructed a complete Cherryvale area model railroad display in the baggage room of this depot. The Dick Webb family, owners of the South Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad, took possession of the depot in 1992, and with a rail excursion and preservation group, restored the depot to it’s original grandeur, keeping every element to it’s original status in 1910. With the purchase of three climate controlled passenger cars, Webb’s Heart of the Heartlands offers excursion train rides out of Cherryvale and other area towns during special celebrations.

The railroad boom in Cherryvale began in 1879 when the Frisco Railroad reached Cherryvale, crossing the already built Santa Fe. The Memphis Railroad Company extended it’s road from Parsons to Cherryvale, and the Santa Fe extended it’s road westward and built a branch line south to Coffeyville. The fall of 1880 saw the M.K. & T. Narrow Gauge road extended from Parsons to Cherryvale. By 1886, Cherryvale had railroads branching in many directions, and the railroad business was thriving.rnJust as it did in the 1800’s, the railroad continues to have a major influence in Cherryvale. The South, Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad currently uses the north-south railroad tracks through Cherryvale with several trains carrying freight and cargo through town.